Grants in Higher Education


TEAGLE FOUNDATION GRANTS IN COMMUNITY SERVICE
Grants for College-Community Connections

Click here for other projects in College-Community Connections


November 2008
Adelphi University
Writing and Reading The City

 

$50,000 over 24 months. In 2006-2007, Adelphi University's Department of English collaborated with Groundwork to offer a group of rising sophomores in Groundwork for Success (GWS) a literature and creative writing program to develop their critical thinking skills and enhance their college preparedness. The program began with a six-week summer session that brought students on weekly field trips—designed to improve their reading and writing—to New York City cultural landmarks, and had them participate in reading and writing workshops—on a variety of literary genres—led by Adelphi's professors of creative writing and assisted by graduate students, advanced undergraduates, and Groundwork staff. An eight-week follow-up session in the spring, this time focused on a single genre led by one Adelphi professor, had students undertake weekly electronic correspondence and bulletin board work, all with an eye to producing a piece of creative work that has been revised at least twice.

Having run the program once, Adelphi and Groundwork have renewed their commitment for a further two years, and have re-structured it a few ways. Still a two-part program, it will now consist of a four-day, three-night residency on Adelphi's campus during the summer, followed by a three-week session at Groundwork's offices that focus on reading, research, and writing. Led by one Adelphi professor, the latter will include classroom discussion and research time, strategic trips to New York City landmarks, and writing and revising workshops. Students will produce writing portfolios with one piece of creative writing that has undergone revision, a checklist of accomplishments, and a self-assessment.

Barnard College
HEAF@Barnard: A Pre-College Program

 

$50,000 over 24 months. In partnership with the Harlem Educational Activities Fund (HEAF), Barnard College offered a semester-long program to a group of 11th grade HEAF students in fall 2006 that had as its goal the fostering of students' creativity, skills, and confidence as they move forward on their own paths toward college. Aiming to giving the students an authentic, on-campus college experience that would demonstrate the breadth and richness of a liberal arts education, the program used as its base an adaptation of the Reacting to the Past course, "The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 BC." (This is the first time a Reacting to the Past course has been adapted for high school students.) The program also featured four lectures in anthropology, art history, classics, and political science, as well as an off-campus performance of Antigone.

Building on the successes of the first year of the program, Barnard and HEAF will run the program for two more years, with some changes. They will build in more in-class time for students to discuss course materials, to undertake weekly academic skills lessons, to complete research and writing assignments, and to listen to guest lectures.

Columbia University
A Partnership between Columbia and DDC

 

$25,000 over 12 months. The partnership between Columbia University's American Studies Program and the Double Discovery Program (DDC) is born out of the Program's mission—to link students to the resources of New York City, to teach them about the human-service needs of the community they live in, and to integrate their studies with voluntary community service—and the academic needs DDC's high school students. The components of the proposed collaboration are two:
  • The American Studies Program will offer a seminar which focuses on issues of equity and access in American higher education over the last century, with a special emphasis on New York City. As part of the course requirements, Columbia students will take on the role of mentors to DDC students and spend at least four hours a week throughout the semester tutoring, hosting visits to Columbia and Barnard College, helping with college application essays and interview preparation, and providing guidance on how to succeed in college. Some mentoring relationships may continue in the summer as well.


  • The American Studies Program will host a series of talks on topics both timeless and urgent, such as how the idea of freedom has been defined and redefined throughout America's history, or the concept of citizenship especially as it pertains to immigrant Americans. In preparation for the talks, DDC students will read relevant, challenging essays which they will discuss with their Columbia student-mentors.

Drew University
A Partnership between Union Settlement and Drew University

 

$25,000 over 12 months. In 2006-2007, Drew University partnered with Union Settlement Association to offer a group of middle and high school students a program aimed at introducing them to the realities of the college experience, including the benefits, challenges, pressures, and opportunities of being a college student and a college graduate. Activities included tutoring by Drew undergraduates for the middle school students, a visit of the Drew campus, and workshops with Drew faculty and Union Settlement staff. The program culminated in "Summer College," a week-long residency on the Drew Campus centered on an academic curriculum consisting of a wide range of classes designed to strengthen students' skills in particular areas (e.g. writing) and to introduce them to subjects and approaches to subjects which they probably have not encountered before (e.g. Arabic, computer science, and biology field work). Students also attended information sessions and evening activities on campus.

Follow-up assessments of the program indicate that it was largely successful, and Drew and Union Settlement have renewed their partnership for a further year. The program will retain the same basic components, but with the following changes: (1) Drew faculty and students will conduct additional sessions (e.g. a creative writing workshop) at Cascades High School, from which the high school students in the program are drawn; (2) High school students will get the full residential experience while the middle school students will only have one night and one day on the Drew campus; and (3) High school students will be expected to produce several assignments and / or participate in a group program or workshop, and to serve as guides and mentors to the middle school students when they are on campus together.
 

Fordham University
The History Makers Program

 

$50,000 over 24 months. "The History Makers Program," a collaboration between Fordham University and the Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB), introduced students in CAB's Adolescent Development Program to history beyond the textbook by combining classroom activities with hands-on research and fieldwork. Led by a Fordham faculty member with assistance from four undergraduate student mentors, and built on Fordham's involvement in the Bronx African-American Oral History Project, the program helped students better understand documented and undocumented histories, exposed them to New York City history that is not often studied in traditional classroom settings, and developed their critical thinking and research skills. Over six weeks in summer 2006, students studied various sites in the classroom and through fieldwork. They spent the final week of the program in residence at Fordham where they finished their group research projects—using primary and secondary sources—on neighborhoods in the Bronx, and then presented their findings to peers and family on their last night on campus.

Fordham and CAB will build on the successes of the program in years two and three, maintaining its academic strength and its focus on the Bronx. Additionally, Fordham proposes to establish an earlier recruiting process for CAB students, and will offer, additionally, a suite of college informational workshops (for example, on financial aid literacy, essay writing, college choice, and college admissions).

New York University
Beyond the Window

 

$25,000 over 12 months. "Beyond the Window," a collaboration between New York University's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and LEDA, is designed to promote leadership development, introducing LEDA students to the policymaking process, developing their research, critical thinking, and presentation skills, and teaching them how to use data to advocate policy changes.

The heart of the program is an intensive, seven-week guided research course to be offered in summer 2008. Taught by a faculty member at the Wagner School, the course curriculum will be modeled after Wagner's graduate policy course, which emphasizes a combination of theory and practice. Students will identify and research a pressing policy issue for their community, and will present their findings and recommendations at the conclusion of the program. During the academic year, LEDA students will be entitled to enroll in undergraduate and associated policy courses at New York University. The program will also sponsor a "speakers series," inviting policy professionals to talk about the field. Students will have the opportunity to "shadow" these professionals at work.

Pace University
Opportunitas in Action: Film, Writing, and Discovery of Self

 

$12,000 over 12 months. A 2006-2007 partnership between Pace University and the Boys' Club of New York developed around a film studies course for high school students, "Opportunitas in Action: Film, Writing, and Discovery of Self," which aimed to develop their visual literacy, critical thinking, and writing skills. The program was offered twice, in the fall and the spring semesters, and was structured around three films (Rear Window, North by Northwest, and Do the Right Thing in the fall; Blade Runner, Psycho, and About a Boy in the spring). Each film was studied over a three-week period: film presentation in the first week, a lecture / discussion led by a Pace professor in the second week, and a tutoring and writing session with Pace undergraduates in the third week.

The partners have renewed their commitment for another year, and will maintain a similar program structure in this second iteration.

Sarah Lawrence College
Writing for Life: Authenticity and Argument

 

$50,000 over 24 months. Sarah Lawrence College partnered with Prep for Prep to offer a program that builds on the distinctive Sarah Lawrence pedagogy—a combination of seminar teaching with one-on-one faculty-student conferences—to a group of rising Prep for Prep sophomores. Designed to help students develop fluency and ease of writing, and to spark (renewed) interest in and awareness of language, this four-week program explored a range of writing genres (personal essays, fiction, poetry, reviews, argument, and expository writing). It also gave students the opportunity to practice their oral presentation skills, and to undertake theater exercises that help to create a feeling of ensemble, break down barriers and resistance, and establish good working relationships within the group.

Plans for the next two years of the program include refinements to the current structure. Sarah Lawrence and Prep for Prep will offer a shorter, but more intense, summer session that will double the number of class hours. With more time, the number of conferences, as well as the number of in-class writing assignments, will also increase. The Prep students will also spend a week with another group of high school students enrolled in a similar summer writing program on the Sarah Lawrence campus in order to bring them into a larger community of writers.

The New School
A Partnership between the Institute for Urban Education at Eugene Lang College and East Side House

 

$25,000 over 12 months. A partnership between the Institute for Urban Education (IUE) at Eugene Lang College and the College Preparatory and Leadership Program (CPLP) at East Side House Settlement in 2006-2007 provided a multi-faceted college preparatory program for high school students at Mott Haven Village Preparatory (MVHP). Several components composed the program, including a professional development piece for CPLP staff and MHVP teachers based on IUE's holistic approach to college readiness; program support from two Lang College students designated as Urban Education Fellows; a College Explorers program incorporating weekly classes, campus visits, discussions of college resources, and exchanges with college students; and a Bridge Course, a college-level class designed for 11th and 12th grade students.

With a successful year of programming behind them, the partners have re-committed for a second year. They will offer a similar program, with the following enhancements: (1) increased enrollment of MHVP students in the Bridge Course; (2) three, rather than two, Urban Education Fellows; (3) a "College Planning Day" with interactive sessions on the college application and admissions process for MHVP students; (4) better access and relations between MHVP and the admissions office at Eugene Lang College.

Vassar College
A Vassar-SEO Collaboration

 

$50,000 over 24 months. Vassar College collaborated with Sponsors for Educational Opportunity (SEO) on a two-part program—based on a team-taught Vassar College course, "The Civil Rights Movement in the United States"—for SEO seniors in 2006-2007. Fifteen students completed a one-week summer intensive on the Vassar campus where they explored the Civil Rights movement, and honed their writing skills in a writing lab that culminated in the Vassar-SEOblog. Students also attended lunchtime talks with Vassar staff about college resources, and met with Vassar undergraduates to learn about their research or creative work. Offered in spring 2007 at SEO's offices, the second part of the program was opened to all fifty SEO seniors. This six-week component extended the work of the summer and had the students complete a range of writing assignments and a critical paper.

Vassar and SEO have renewed their commitment to the program for another two years and propose to offer the same summer intensive session on the same subject team-taught by the same faculty. They hope to increase the number of students to 20-25, and will also offer the same follow-up spring component.

February 2006
Adelphi University
Writing and Reading The City

 

$50,000 over 24 months. In 2006-2007, Adelphi University's Department of English collaborated with Groundwork to offer a group of rising sophomores in Groundwork for Success (GWS) a literature and creative writing program to develop their critical thinking skills and enhance their college preparedness. The program began with a six-week summer session that brought students on weekly field trips—designed to improve their reading and writing—to New York City cultural landmarks, and had them participate in reading and writing workshops—on a variety of literary genres—led by Adelphi's professors of creative writing and assisted by graduate students, advanced undergraduates, and Groundwork staff. An eight-week follow-up session in the spring, this time focused on a single genre led by one Adelphi professor, had students undertake weekly electronic correspondence and bulletin board work, all with an eye to producing a piece of creative work that has been revised at least twice.

Having run the program once, Adelphi and Groundwork have renewed their commitment for a further two years, and have re-structured it a few ways. Still a two-part program, it will now consist of a four-day, three-night residency on Adelphi's campus during the summer, followed by a three-week session at Groundwork's offices that focus on reading, research, and writing. Led by one Adelphi professor, the latter will include classroom discussion and research time, strategic trips to New York City landmarks, and writing and revising workshops. Students will produce writing portfolios with one piece of creative writing that has undergone revision, a checklist of accomplishments, and a self-assessment.

Barnard College
HEAF@Barnard: A Pre-College Program

 

$50,000 over 24 months. In partnership with the Harlem Educational Activities Fund (HEAF), Barnard College offered a semester-long program to a group of 11th grade HEAF students in fall 2006 that had as its goal the fostering of students' creativity, skills, and confidence as they move forward on their own paths toward college. Aiming to giving the students an authentic, on-campus college experience that would demonstrate the breadth and richness of a liberal arts education, the program used as its base an adaptation of the Reacting to the Past course, "The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 BC." (This is the first time a Reacting to the Past course has been adapted for high school students.) The program also featured four lectures in anthropology, art history, classics, and political science, as well as an off-campus performance of Antigone.

Building on the successes of the first year of the program, Barnard and HEAF will run the program for two more years, with some changes. They will build in more in-class time for students to discuss course materials, to undertake weekly academic skills lessons, to complete research and writing assignments, and to listen to guest lectures.

Columbia University
A Partnership between Columbia and DDC

 

$25,000 over 12 months. The partnership between Columbia University's American Studies Program and the Double Discovery Program (DDC) is born out of the Program's mission—to link students to the resources of New York City, to teach them about the human-service needs of the community they live in, and to integrate their studies with voluntary community service—and the academic needs DDC's high school students. The components of the proposed collaboration are two:
  • The American Studies Program will offer a seminar which focuses on issues of equity and access in American higher education over the last century, with a special emphasis on New York City. As part of the course requirements, Columbia students will take on the role of mentors to DDC students and spend at least four hours a week throughout the semester tutoring, hosting visits to Columbia and Barnard College, helping with college application essays and interview preparation, and providing guidance on how to succeed in college. Some mentoring relationships may continue in the summer as well.


  • The American Studies Program will host a series of talks on topics both timeless and urgent, such as how the idea of freedom has been defined and redefined throughout America's history, or the concept of citizenship especially as it pertains to immigrant Americans. In preparation for the talks, DDC students will read relevant, challenging essays which they will discuss with their Columbia student-mentors.

Drew University
A Partnership between Union Settlement and Drew University

 

$25,000 over 12 months. In 2006-2007, Drew University partnered with Union Settlement Association to offer a group of middle and high school students a program aimed at introducing them to the realities of the college experience, including the benefits, challenges, pressures, and opportunities of being a college student and a college graduate. Activities included tutoring by Drew undergraduates for the middle school students, a visit of the Drew campus, and workshops with Drew faculty and Union Settlement staff. The program culminated in "Summer College," a week-long residency on the Drew Campus centered on an academic curriculum consisting of a wide range of classes designed to strengthen students' skills in particular areas (e.g. writing) and to introduce them to subjects and approaches to subjects which they probably have not encountered before (e.g. Arabic, computer science, and biology field work). Students also attended information sessions and evening activities on campus.

Follow-up assessments of the program indicate that it was largely successful, and Drew and Union Settlement have renewed their partnership for a further year. The program will retain the same basic components, but with the following changes: (1) Drew faculty and students will conduct additional sessions (e.g. a creative writing workshop) at Cascades High School, from which the high school students in the program are drawn; (2) High school students will get the full residential experience while the middle school students will only have one night and one day on the Drew campus; and (3) High school students will be expected to produce several assignments and / or participate in a group program or workshop, and to serve as guides and mentors to the middle school students when they are on campus together.

Fordham University
The History Makers Program

 

$50,000 over 24 months. "The History Makers Program," a collaboration between Fordham University and the Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB), introduced students in CAB's Adolescent Development Program to history beyond the textbook by combining classroom activities with hands-on research and fieldwork. Led by a Fordham faculty member with assistance from four undergraduate student mentors, and built on Fordham's involvement in the Bronx African-American Oral History Project, the program helped students better understand documented and undocumented histories, exposed them to New York City history that is not often studied in traditional classroom settings, and developed their critical thinking and research skills. Over six weeks in summer 2006, students studied various sites in the classroom and through fieldwork. They spent the final week of the program in residence at Fordham where they finished their group research projects—using primary and secondary sources—on neighborhoods in the Bronx, and then presented their findings to peers and family on their last night on campus.

Fordham and CAB will build on the successes of the program in years two and three, maintaining its academic strength and its focus on the Bronx. Additionally, Fordham proposes to establish an earlier recruiting process for CAB students, and will offer, additionally, a suite of college informational workshops (for example, on financial aid literacy, essay writing, college choice, and college admissions).

The New School
A Partnership between the Institute for Urban Education at Eugene Lang College and East Side House

 

$25,000 over 12 months. A partnership between the Institute for Urban Education (IUE) at Eugene Lang College and the College Preparatory and Leadership Program (CPLP) at East Side House Settlement in 2006-2007 provided a multi-faceted college preparatory program for high school students at Mott Haven Village Preparatory (MVHP). Several components composed the program, including a professional development piece for CPLP staff and MHVP teachers based on IUE's holistic approach to college readiness; program support from two Lang College students designated as Urban Education Fellows; a College Explorers program incorporating weekly classes, campus visits, discussions of college resources, and exchanges with college students; and a Bridge Course, a college-level class designed for 11th and 12th grade students.

With a successful year of programming behind them, the partners have re-committed for a second year. They will offer a similar program, with the following enhancements: (1) increased enrollment of MHVP students in the Bridge Course; (2) three, rather than two, Urban Education Fellows; (3) a "College Planning Day" with interactive sessions on the college application and admissions process for MHVP students; (4) better access and relations between MHVP and the admissions office at Eugene Lang College.

New York University
Beyond the Window

 

$25,000 over 12 months. "Beyond the Window," a collaboration between New York University's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and LEDA, is designed to promote leadership development, introducing LEDA students to the policymaking process, developing their research, critical thinking, and presentation skills, and teaching them how to use data to advocate policy changes.

The heart of the program is an intensive, seven-week guided research course to be offered in summer 2008. Taught by a faculty member at the Wagner School, the course curriculum will be modeled after Wagner's graduate policy course, which emphasizes a combination of theory and practice. Students will identify and research a pressing policy issue for their community, and will present their findings and recommendations at the conclusion of the program. During the academic year, LEDA students will be entitled to enroll in undergraduate and associated policy courses at New York University. The program will also sponsor a "speakers series," inviting policy professionals to talk about the field. Students will have the opportunity to "shadow" these professionals at work.

Pace University
Opportunitas in Action: Film, Writing, and Discovery of Self

 

$12,000 over 12 months. A 2006-2007 partnership between Pace University and the Boys' Club of New York developed around a film studies course for high school students, "Opportunitas in Action: Film, Writing, and Discovery of Self," which aimed to develop their visual literacy, critical thinking, and writing skills. The program was offered twice, in the fall and the spring semesters, and was structured around three films (Rear Window, North by Northwest, and Do the Right Thing in the fall; Blade Runner, Psycho, and About a Boy in the spring). Each film was studied over a three-week period: film presentation in the first week, a lecture / discussion led by a Pace professor in the second week, and a tutoring and writing session with Pace undergraduates in the third week.

The partners have renewed their commitment for another year, and will maintain a similar program structure in this second iteration.

Sarah Lawrence College
Writing for Life: Authenticity and Argument

 

$50,000 over 24 months. Sarah Lawrence College partnered with Prep for Prep to offer a program that builds on the distinctive Sarah Lawrence pedagogy—a combination of seminar teaching with one-on-one faculty-student conferences—to a group of rising Prep for Prep sophomores. Designed to help students develop fluency and ease of writing, and to spark (renewed) interest in and awareness of language, this four-week program explored a range of writing genres (personal essays, fiction, poetry, reviews, argument, and expository writing). It also gave students the opportunity to practice their oral presentation skills, and to undertake theater exercises that help to create a feeling of ensemble, break down barriers and resistance, and establish good working relationships within the group.

Plans for the next two years of the program include refinements to the current structure. Sarah Lawrence and Prep for Prep will offer a shorter, but more intense, summer session that will double the number of class hours. With more time, the number of conferences, as well as the number of in-class writing assignments, will also increase. The Prep students will also spend a week with another group of high school students enrolled in a similar summer writing program on the Sarah Lawrence campus in order to bring them into a larger community of writers.

Vassar College
A Vassar-SEO Collaboration

 

$50,000 over 24 months. Vassar College collaborated with Sponsors for Educational Opportunity (SEO) on a two-part program—based on a team-taught Vassar College course, "The Civil Rights Movement in the United States"—for SEO seniors in 2006-2007. Fifteen students completed a one-week summer intensive on the Vassar campus where they explored the Civil Rights movement, and honed their writing skills in a writing lab that culminated in the Vassar-SEOblog. Students also attended lunchtime talks with Vassar staff about college resources, and met with Vassar undergraduates to learn about their research or creative work. Offered in spring 2007 at SEO's offices, the second part of the program was opened to all fifty SEO seniors. This six-week component extended the work of the summer and had the students complete a range of writing assignments and a critical paper.

Vassar and SEO have renewed their commitment to the program for another two years and propose to offer the same summer intensive session on the same subject team-taught by the same faculty. They hope to increase the number of students to 20-25, and will also offer the same follow-up spring component.