The Cornerstone: Learning for Living initiative aims to revitalize the role of the humanities in general education.

04.19.2024 | TEAGLE IN THE NEWS

Helios Program celebrates two years of success

UW-Platteville's Cornerstone program doubled partcipation and gave more than 1,400 students a more meaningful experience in the gen ed curriculum.
Helios Program celebrates two years of success >
03.18.2024 | TEAGLE IN THE NEWS

Education for a life of purpose

Teagle supported Stanford's reimagined first-year curriculum COLLEGE, which provides students with a shared intellectual framework to discuss diverse ideas.
Education for a life of purpose >
02.15.2024 | WEBINAR

Sarah Igo on Teaching Plato and bell hooks

Professor Sarah Igo of Vanderbilt University describes how she teaches Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” and bell hooks’ “Democratic Education” together.
Sarah Igo on Teaching Plato and bell hooks >
01.23.2024 | TEAGLE IN THE NEWS

Reimagining the Liberal Arts and Humanities

Teagle is part of a widespread effort to reimagine the liberal arts in higher education, infusing humanities courses into the general curriculum at 60 colleges and universities. 
Reimagining the Liberal Arts and Humanities >
10.26.2023 | TEAGLE IN THE NEWS

Syracuse Speaks: growing the knowledge of the Indigenous Cultures

A new class at Onondaga Community College highlights indigenous texts in the study of Central New York's settlement.

Syracuse Speaks: growing the knowledge of the Indigenous Cultures >
10.05.2023 | TEAGLE IN THE NEWS

Community College Is the Future of Liberal Education

With support from Teagle, community colleges across the country are giving thousands of students the "transformative experience of a liberal education."

Community College Is the Future of Liberal Education >
10.02.2023 | TEAGLE IN THE NEWS

Languages, Literatures and Cultures Professors Awarded $300,000 to Create a Cornerstone Initiative

With support from Teagle, UMass Amherst is adding two new gen ed courses designed to build a common intellectual community.

Languages, Literatures and Cultures Professors Awarded $300,000 to Create a Cornerstone Initiative >
09.18.2023 | TEAGLE IN THE NEWS

Gen Z Is Ready to Talk. Are Professors Ready to Listen?

Purdue University is reaching a new generation of students and leading a liberal arts reform movement through its Cornerstone: Learning for Living program.

Gen Z Is Ready to Talk. Are Professors Ready to Listen? >

Advisory Council

Emily Bernard

Emily Bernard

Julian Lindsay Green & Gold Professor, University of Vermont.
Member, 2023-2025
Emily Bernard

Emily Bernard

Emily Bernard is the Julian Lindsay Green & Gold Professor of English.  She holds a B. A. and a Ph. D. in American Studies from Yale University. Bernard has received fellowships from the Alphonse A. Fletcher Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the MacDowell Colony, the Vermont Arts Council, and the W. E. B. DuBois Institute at Harvard University. She was the inaugural James Weldon Johnson Senior Research Fellow in African American Studies at Yale University. Her published works include: Remember Me to Harlem: The Letters of Langston Hughes and Carl Van Vechten, which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year; Some of My Best Friends: Writers on Interracial Friendship, which was chosen by the New York Public Library as a Book for the Teen Age; and Michelle Obama: The First Lady in Photographs, which received a 2010 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work.  Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance: A Portrait in Black and White, was published by Yale University Press in 2012. Bernard’s essays have been reprinted in Best American Essays, Best African American Essays and Best of Creative Nonfiction. Her most recent book, Black is the Body: Stories from My Grandmother’s Time, My Mother’s Time, and Mine, was published by Alfred A. Knopf in the spring of 2019. Black is the Body  won the Christopher Isherwood Prize for autobiographical prose in the Los Angeles Times 2020 Book Prizes competition.  A native of Nashville, Tennessee, Emily Bernard has been a faculty member at UVM since 2001
Russell Berman

Russell Berman

Professor of Comparative Literature and German Studies, Walter A. Haas Professor in the Humanities
Stanford University
Member, 2023-2025
Russell Berman

Russell Berman

Professor Berman joined the Stanford faculty in 1979. In 1982-83 he was a Mellon Faculty Fellow in the Humanities at Harvard, and in 1988-89 he held an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship in Berlin. In 1997 he was awarded the Bundesverdienstkreuz of the Federal Republic of Germany. Professor Berman is the editor of the journal Telos.
Rachel Hadas

Rachel Hadas

Board of Governors Professor of English
Rutgers University-Newark
Member, 2023-2025
 
Rachel Hadas

Rachel Hadas

Rachel Hadas is the author of numerous books of poetry, essays, and translations. She most recently co-edited the anthology The Greek Poets: Homes to the Present. Her latest book of poems is The Ache of Appetite, and Strange Relation: A Memoir of Marriage, Dementia, and Poetry, a book of prose about her husband's illness. Rachel Hadas studied classics at Harvard, poetry at Johns Hopkins, and comparative literature at Princeton.  Between college and graduate school she spent four years in Greece, an experience that surfaces variously in much of her work. Since 1981 she has taught in the English Department of the Newark (NJ) campus of Rutgers University, and has also taught courses in literature and writing at Columbia and Princeton, as well as serving on the poetry faculty of the Sewanee Writers’ Conference and the West Chester Poetry Conference.  She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry, an Ingram Merrill Foundation grant in poetry, and an award in literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters.

Rachel's latest collaborative work with her husband, Shalom Gorewitz:
Externalhttp://newark.rutgers.edu/news/acclaimed-bard-finds-new-voice

Major Jackson

Major Jackson

Professor of English, Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Chair in the Humanities
Vanderbilt University
Member, 2023-2025

Major Jackson

Major Jackson

Major Jackson is the author of five volumes of poetry, most recently The Absurd Man (Norton: 2020). His other books include Roll DeepHolding CompanyHoops and Leaving Saturn, recipient of a Cave Canem Poetry Prize. His edited volumes include Best American Poetry 2019Renga for Obama, and Library of America’s Countee Cullen: Collected Poems. A recipient of fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, The Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, Jackson has been awarded a Pushcart Prize, a Whiting Writers’ Award, and has been honored by the Pew Fellowship in the Arts and the Witter Bynner Foundation in conjunction with the Library of Congress. He has published poems and essays in American Poetry ReviewThe New YorkerParis ReviewPloughsharesPoetry London, Orion MagazineYale Review, among other fine publications. His poetry has received critical attention in The New York TimesChristian Science Monitor, and on National Public Radio's All Things Considered. Major Jackson is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English. He serves as the Poetry Editor of The Harvard Review.
Roosevelt Montás

Roosevelt Montás

Senior Lecturer of American Studies and English
Columbia University
Member, 2023-2025
Roosevelt Montás

Roosevelt Montás

Roosevelt Montás is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Columbia University.  He holds an A.B. (1995), an M.A. (1996), and a Ph.D. (2004) in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University.  He was Director of the Center for the Core Curriculum at Columbia College from 2008 to 2018.  Roosevelt specializes in Antebellum American literature and culture, with a particular interest in American citizenship.  His dissertation, Rethinking America: Abolitionism and the Antebellum Transformation of the Discourse of National Identity, won Columbia University’s 2004 Bancroft Award.  In 2000, he received the Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching by a Graduate Student.  Roosevelt teaches “Introduction to Contemporary Civilization in the West,” a year-long course on primary texts in moral and political thought, as well as seminars in American Studies including “Freedom and Citizenship in the United States.” He is also a Rene Plessner Lecturer in Freedom and Citizenship. The F&C program is sponsored by the Center for American Studies and the Double Discovery Center. He speaks and writes on the history, meaning, and future of liberal education and is writing a book for Princeton University Press about his experiences as a student and teacher.

David Reingold

David Reingold

Justin S. Morrill Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Professor of Sociology
Purdue University
Member, 2023-2025
David Reingold

David A. Reingold

David A. Reingold is the Justin S. Morrill Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Professor of Sociology at Purdue University. He serves as the chief academic and administrative officer of the college and is responsible for the departments of History, English, Sociology, Political Science, Philosophy, and Anthropology, as well as the Brian Lamb School of Communication, the Patti and Rusty Rueff School of Visual and Performing Arts, the School of Languages and Culture, and the School of Interdisciplinary Studies. Prior to his appointment at Purdue University, he was professor and Executive Associate Dean at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University-Bloomington.

His primary teaching and research areas include urban poverty, economic development, social welfare policy, low-income housing policy, civil society, and government performance. His research has appeared in the Journal of Policy Analysis and ManagementPublic Administration ReviewSocial Service Review, Urban Studies, the Journal of Urban Affairs, and Housing Studies, among other social science journals. His public service experience includes positions as director of research and policy development at the U.S. Corporation for National and Community Service, a member of the White House Task Force for Disadvantaged Youth and chair of the Task Force’s research committee, housing commissioner and vice-chairman of the Bloomington Housing Authority Board, board president of the South Central Community Action Program, and chair of the Indiana Commission on Community Service and Volunteerism.

He has served on expert panels for the U.S. National Academy of Public Administration and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He has served on editorial boards for the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Social Service Review, Evaluation Reviewthe Journal of Urban Affairs, and the Journal of Public Affairs Education. He received his MA and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.

Elizabeth D. Samet

Elizabeth D. Samet

Professor of English
The United States Military Academy at West Point
Member, 2023-2025
 

Elizabeth D. Samet

Elizabeth D. Samet

Elizabeth D. Samet holds a Ph.D. in English Language and Literature from Yale. She is Professor of English at the United States Military Academy at West Point, where she directs the first-year core course in literature. Her books include Soldier’s Heart: Reading Literature Through Peace and War at West Point, which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Current Interest and was named one of the 100 Notable Books of 2007 by the New York Times; and No Man’s Land: Preparing for War and Peace in Post-9/11 America. Samet is also the editor of The Annotated Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant and Leadership: Essential Writings by Our Greatest Thinkers, as well as of the forthcoming Library of America collection World War II Memoirs. Samet is the past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship to support research for Looking for the Good War: American Amnesia and the Violent Pursuit of Happiness, which will be published in fall 2021. Her honors also include the Hiett Prize in the Humanities and a 2019-2020 NEH Public Scholar Grant for her current project, a biography of Alexander the Great.

Melinda Zook

Melinda Zook

Germaine Seelye Oesterle Professor of History
Purdue University
Member, 2023-2025
Melinda Zook

Melinda S. Zook

Melinda S. Zook received her Ph.D. from Georgetown University. She is a specialist in the history of Tudor and Stuart England, political thought, and religion and women in early modern Europe. Professor Zook teaches courses on English and medieval history, as well as on such topics as Shakespeare’s Kings, great books and the search for meaning and the history of toleration. She has published articles on radical politics, martyrdom, women and religion, and teaching. Her book Radical Whigs and Conspiratorial Politics in late Stuart England was published by Penn State Press in 1999 and in paperback in 2009. In 2013, she published Protestantism, Politics and Women in Britain, 1660-1714 with Palgrave, awarded Best Book on Gender for 2013 by the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. She is the co-editor of Revolutionary Currents: Nation Building in the Transatlantic World (2004); Challenging Orthodoxies: The Social and Cultural World of Early Modern Women (2014); and Generations of Women Historians: Within and Beyond the Academy (2018). She is currently the Director of Cornerstone: Integrated Liberal Arts for the College of Liberal Arts.